butthorn:

I had to get my driver’s license renewed and managed to take the most unflattering picture ever.

butthorn:

I had to get my driver’s license renewed and managed to take the most unflattering picture ever.

sarahseeandersen:

Bitter? Me? Never!

sarahseeandersen:

Bitter? Me? Never!

twitterthecomic:


"I MISS HER TOO, SON, BUT SHE’S IN A BETTER PLACE" “heaven?" “NO, GAMESTOP. WHY WOULD YOUR SEGA SATURN BE IN HEAVEN?" “i miss mom." “I DONT"
— Mike Rosenthal (@VectorBelly) July 6, 2013

twitterthecomic:

spongeblogspringerpants:

Detail from Stained Glass Window, Oude Kerk, Amsterdam the Netherlands
Arms of the Burgomasters of Amsterdam from 1578 to 1757; started by Piter Jansz in 1654.

spongeblogspringerpants:

Detail from Stained Glass Window, Oude Kerk, Amsterdam the Netherlands

Arms of the Burgomasters of Amsterdam from 1578 to 1757; started by Piter Jansz in 1654.

libralthinking:

The Century Chest is a time capsule buried by the Ladies Aid Society and the First Lutheran Church in downtown OKC on April 22, 1913. Exactly 100 years later, on April 22, 2013, the Century Chest was opened and the contents were presented to the citizens of Oklahoma City.  Source: Oklahoma Historical Society.  More on their Facebook page.

 
Astonishing!  I can’t believe how NEW everything looks.  What a remarkable look into the past!
aenglaland:

The ruins of Rievaulx Abbey in North Yorkshire. Established in 1132 and dissolved in 1538 by the orders of Henry the 8th during the period of the dissolution of the English Monasteries. It was one of the largest and wealthiest abbeys in England. 

aenglaland:

The ruins of Rievaulx Abbey in North Yorkshire. Established in 1132 and dissolved in 1538 by the orders of Henry the 8th during the period of the dissolution of the English Monasteries. It was one of the largest and wealthiest abbeys in England. 

thecivilwarparlor:

 “Angel’s Glow” Soldiers with Glowing Wounds at Shiloh-Wounded soldiers who had to remain at the battleground in the rain and mud for up to two days before medics could reach them noticed that their wounds were glowing in the dark. 

P. luminescens’s presence at Shiloh and the reports of the strange glow- bacteria, along with nematodes, got into the soldiers’ wounds from the soil. This not only turned their wounds into night lights, but may have saved their lives.

Tennessee in the spring is green and cool. Nighttime temperatures in early April would have been low enough for the soldiers who were out there in the rain for two days to get hypothermia, lowering their body temperature and giving P. luminescens a good home. Based on the evidence for P. luminescens’s presence at Shiloh and the reports of the strange glow, bacteria, along with the nematodes, got into the soldiers’ wounds from the soil. This not only turned their wounds into night lights, but may have saved their lives. The chemical cocktail that P. luminescens uses to clear out its competition probably helped kill off other pathogens that might have infected the soldiers’ wounds. Since neither P. luminescens nor its associated nematode species are very infectious to humans, they would have soon been cleaned out by the immune system themselves.

Two high school students, Bill Martin and Jon Curtis from Bowie, MD won the Intel International Science Fair competition in 2001 with their research into the curious story of soldiers who survived being wounded at the Battle of Shiloh during the Civil War in the spring of 1862.

http://xenophilius.wordpress.com/2012/04/12/why-some-civil-war-soldiers-glowed-in-the-dark/

http://bio230fall2010.wordpress.com/2012/04/11/civil-war-ghost-soldiers/